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FAQ About Fish

Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) are the most profitable and popular fish in Antarctic waters. Priced at US$10.00/kilo, these fish can grow up to 6.5ft (2 m) long, and weigh around 100kg. In the 1990s, it was dubbed the Chilean sea bass to make it more appealing commercially and in restaurants. However most are not caught near Chile, and they are of the family Nototheniidae, not Centrarchidae (bass). These fish can live up to 20 years, and 50 on some accounts.

Photo credit Greenpeace Oceans and B. Mahalski on Flickr.com

Do fish bite?

Any organism with a mouth can bite. Whether they inflict a wound or injury is another question.

When someone thinks of an injury from a fish, most people would think of sharks and the reported incidents of them biting off a limb or leaving a nasty gash in one’s side. While most people believe these are just ruthless animals, the reality is that sharks, as well as most fish, are simply instinctive. The major percentile of the fish species has poor eyesight and rely on scent or magnetic pulses in the water. This being said, a surfer laying on a board can be easily mistaken for a seal, or fingers and toes can be easily mistaken for smaller fish or coral. Then the issue of water clarity comes up; is it dark? Is the water murky? Is it foggy?

However, when eyesight is not an issue, you must remember that a fish’s main goal is to survive to reproduce. So, they will do all they can to protect their offspring. A piranha is one of the many known toothed fish and is coined as a man-eater. While they do have sharp teeth, they only use them to either eat decaying matter or to protect themselves and their offspring. Most cases of piranha attacks are because a passerby wandered too closely to its nest. Other fish all over the world, even goldfish, will nip at you if they think you pose a threat to their eggs.

There are little or no cases of fish attacking a human for recreation.

Arrow blennies (Lucayablennius zingaro) are among some of few tube blennies. The distinct curvature of the body, shaped like a question mark, helps the fish to hover in the water when idle. These blennies are often found alongside schools of masked gobies (Coryphopterus personatus). These reef dwellers are most commonly sighted near or under cliffs and drop-offs. 

Photo credit portoforigin on Flickr.com

Arrow blennies (Lucayablennius zingaro) are among some of few tube blennies. The distinct curvature of the body, shaped like a question mark, helps the fish to hover in the water when idle. These blennies are often found alongside schools of masked gobies (Coryphopterus personatus). These reef dwellers are most commonly sighted near or under cliffs and drop-offs.

Photo credit portoforigin on Flickr.com

The clown knifefish (chitala chitala) is both a domestic and wild species. They inhabit freshwater systems such as swamps, lakes, and rivers. In the wild, they feed on mollusks, insects, shrimps, and smaller fishes. Females lay their eggs on stumps of wood while the male continuously aerates them by fanning the roe with his tail. This also keeps them free of silt. Clown knifefish are often confused with its relative C. ornata but can be easily shown apart as C. chitala does not have ocellated spots.

Photo credit svaampus on Flickr.com

The clown knifefish (chitala chitala) is both a domestic and wild species. They inhabit freshwater systems such as swamps, lakes, and rivers. In the wild, they feed on mollusks, insects, shrimps, and smaller fishes. Females lay their eggs on stumps of wood while the male continuously aerates them by fanning the roe with his tail. This also keeps them free of silt. Clown knifefish are often confused with its relative C. ornata but can be easily shown apart as C. chitala does not have ocellated spots.

Photo credit svaampus on Flickr.com

Spotted trunkfish (Lactophrys bicaudalis) are residents of shallow reefs and grass-beds. Growing up to 21” (53 cm) these fish are known for their trunk-like mouth. They are regarded as boxfish due to the deepness and wideness of their bodies. Scientists have suspected that L. bicaudalis secretes a poison that can kill other fish, but research is still underway.

Photo credit E=mcSCOW and Drydoc57 on Flickr.com

Reblogged from souljaboytelllem  5 notes

Yellowhead jawfish (Opistognathus aurifrons) are aptly named for their yellow heads. They are known for their egg-protecting habits. Male jawfish keep the eggs in his mouth (top picture) for 8-10 days before hatching. These fish are found in reefs, but often kept as aquarium pets. They are fun and entertaining and love to people watch.

Photo credit JimC_1946 and Electrokate on Flickr.com

Reblogged from souljaboytelllem  4 notes
The slippery dick (Halichoeres bivittatus) is a member of the family Labridae, or wrasses. This breed can grow to 9” (23 cm) and are found from North Carolina to Brazil, among shallow coral and rocky reefs. Throughout its lifespan, these fish undergo little to no color change as they age. If the shoal loses a dominant male or female, it can change sexes to fit the role.

Photo credit Bryant, K. on Flickr.com
The slippery dick (Halichoeres bivittatus) is a member of the family Labridae, or wrasses. This breed can grow to 9” (23 cm) and are found from North Carolina to Brazil, among shallow coral and rocky reefs. Throughout its lifespan, these fish undergo little to no color change as they age. If the shoal loses a dominant male or female, it can change sexes to fit the role.

Photo credit Bryant, K. on Flickr.com

Bluebanded gobies (Lythrypnus dalli) grow up to 2 1/2” (6.5 cm). These fish are identified by their bright orangish red scales with 4 to 9 blue stripes, not to be confused with the Zebra Goby (Lythrypnus zebra. Bluebanded gobies range from Morro Bay, CA to the Gulf of California. From May to August, the male courts to female by dashing at her several times in rapid succession. After the female lays her eggs, the male guards them until they hatch.

Photo credit Peter Liu Photography on Flickr.com

Bluebanded gobies (Lythrypnus dalli) grow up to 2 1/2” (6.5 cm). These fish are identified by their bright orangish red scales with 4 to 9 blue stripes, not to be confused with the Zebra Goby (Lythrypnus zebra. Bluebanded gobies range from Morro Bay, CA to the Gulf of California. From May to August, the male courts to female by dashing at her several times in rapid succession. After the female lays her eggs, the male guards them until they hatch.

Photo credit Peter Liu Photography on Flickr.com

Reblogged from crystal-brite  5 notes

crystal-brite:

Flying Fish

From BBC Life

Contrary to popular belief, flyingfishes (Family Exocoetidae) do not actually fly, they glide. At the surface of the water, they swim quickly then launch themselves into the air. This is a means of defense, in order to get away from a predator. By using the latter part of the caudal tail, they can double their speed from 35 kph (22 mph) to 70 kph (45 mph) while airborne. Travel time is usually about 30 seconds, and can be as far as 400 meters, depending on the wind currents. The fish in this gifset is the four-winged flyingfish.

Cavefish (Family Amblyopsidae) are strange fish. Their habitats are confined to clears pools in caves over mud, sand, and gravel. Interestingly enough, if the fish comes in contact with any light while maturing, small, rudimentary eyes will grow and pigmentation will occur. If the fish does not come in contact with light while maturing, it will remain eyeless and lack pigmentation. There are three species in North America - Northern cavefish (Amblyopsis spelaea), Southern cavefish (Typhlichthys subterraneus), and Spring cavefish (Forbesichthys agassizii). In adults, the anus is situated near the gill membranes.

Photo credit Valenzuela, D. on Flickr.com

Cavefish (Family Amblyopsidae) are strange fish. Their habitats are confined to clears pools in caves over mud, sand, and gravel. Interestingly enough, if the fish comes in contact with any light while maturing, small, rudimentary eyes will grow and pigmentation will occur. If the fish does not come in contact with light while maturing, it will remain eyeless and lack pigmentation. There are three species in North America - Northern cavefish (Amblyopsis spelaea), Southern cavefish (Typhlichthys subterraneus), and Spring cavefish (Forbesichthys agassizii). In adults, the anus is situated near the gill membranes.

Photo credit Valenzuela, D. on Flickr.com
At first glance, this large fish may look like a shark. But upon further inspection, it is actually a cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a worldwide species that is the only specie of its family. Although these fish can grow up to 6’7” (2 m), they linger around larger fish for food scraps and protection, like its relatives, the remoras (family Echeneidae). Cobia are often found around the surface of the water in open waters near boats or floating shelter. They will take a hook baited with almost any bait.

Photo credit Teo, C. on Flickr.com

At first glance, this large fish may look like a shark. But upon further inspection, it is actually a cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a worldwide species that is the only specie of its family. Although these fish can grow up to 6’7” (2 m), they linger around larger fish for food scraps and protection, like its relatives, the remoras (family Echeneidae). Cobia are often found around the surface of the water in open waters near boats or floating shelter. They will take a hook baited with almost any bait.

Photo credit Teo, C. on Flickr.com

Reblogged from donnacabonna  138,941 notes
The common goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) is a freshwater fish and is one of the earliest species of fish to be domesticated. The goldfish belongs to the carp family, and was first domesticated in China over a thousand years ago. Since then, over a hundred different breeds have been developed.

Other fish in this tank include the oranda goldfish, a type of fancy goldfish, and a black moor, known for it’s large protruding eyes. 

Photo credit Japanese Content on Tumblr.com

The common goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) is a freshwater fish and is one of the earliest species of fish to be domesticated. The goldfish belongs to the carp family, and was first domesticated in China over a thousand years ago. Since then, over a hundred different breeds have been developed.

Other fish in this tank include the oranda goldfish, a type of fancy goldfish, and a black moor, known for it’s large protruding eyes.

Photo credit Japanese Content on Tumblr.com

Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy), often called “Musky”, are large freshwater fish that often grow to 6’ (1.8 m). These fish are most common in North America and popular among anglers. Despite feeding mainly on smaller fish, it will eat any animal it can swallow, including small ducks and amphibians. This species and and Northern Pike have been interbred to produce a Tiger Muskellunge. 

Photo credit Camper, A. on Flickr.com

Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy), often called “Musky”, are large freshwater fish that often grow to 6’ (1.8 m). These fish are most common in North America and popular among anglers. Despite feeding mainly on smaller fish, it will eat any animal it can swallow, including small ducks and amphibians. This species and and Northern Pike have been interbred to produce a Tiger Muskellunge.

Photo credit Camper, A. on Flickr.com